Cananga Oil’s Wide Appeal

Cananga essential oil is one amazing natural oil that is sought after by many reputed cosmetics brands. The oil has been, since quite a long time, been a part of the league of top cosmetics brands and is continuing to do so.

Cananga is a plant. The oil taken from the flower is used primarily as an ingredient in foods and cosmetics. Cananga oil does not have any medicinal uses.

In foods, cananga oil is used as a flavoring agent in –

  • Gelatins
  • Puddings
  • Beverages

In cosmetics and soaps, it is used as a fragrance.

An evergreen tree, 10-40 m tall, in cultivation often pruned to 3 m; trunk up to 75 cm in diameter, without buttresses; bark pale grey or silvery, smooth. Branches drooping, or slightly erect with dangling leafy twigs; young twigs minutely pubescent, glabrescent. Leaves alternate, distichous, simple, exstipulate; petiole slender, 1-2 cm long, narrowly grooved, glabrous; blade elliptical to ovate-oblong, 13-29 cm x 4-10 cm, base often oblique, rounded cordate, margin more or less undulating, apex acutely acuminate, membranous, midrib and lateral veins mostly whitish-pubescent on both sides, secondary veins in 8-9 pairs, clearly visible on both sides, often with small, hairy, pitted glands in vein axils.

Don’t confuse cananga oil with ylang ylang oil (oil from Canangium odorata genuina).

Cananga oil appears to be safe for most people when applied to the skin in concentrations up to 0.8%. Cananga oil can cause allergic skin reactions in sensitive people. There isn’t enough information to know if cananga oil is safe to take by mouth in amounts higher than those typically used for food flavoring.

The appropriate dose of cananga oil for use as treatment depends on several factors such as the user’s age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for cananga oil.

Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

Okay, now have a look at our reference links –

  1. Cananga Oil Benefits by Aromatherapies
  2. Cananga Oil by WG
  3. Cananga Oil by RXL

Cananga And Ylang-Ylang Oil Parity

Cananga essential oil is illustrious all over the world or its various amazing qualities. But there is a catch about this oil; it is very similar to Ylang Ylang in terms of its notes. And that is precisely one reason it is often confused with Ylang Ylang oil.

Both cananga oil and ylang-ylang oil are obtained by distillation of the flowers of C. odorata; cananga oil from cv. group Cananga (forma macrophylla), ylang-ylang oil from cv. group Ylang-ylang (forma genuina). In the Comoro Islands and Nosy BÚ ylang-ylang concrete is produced by petroleum ether extraction of the flowers. A volatile oil can be distilled from the leaves but it has no economic value.

Whereas cananga oil is traded as a complete oil, ylang-ylang oil is fractionated into different grades; in Madagascar 4 qualities are recognized: ‘Extra’, ‘First’, ‘Second’ and ‘Third’. An additional grade, ‘Premier’ quality, is only produced to order. ‘Extra’ and ‘First’ are used mostly in fine perfumery, ‘Second’ and ‘Third’ in soap perfumery; ‘Extra’ and ‘Third’ are most important in trade. Essential oils (paragraph 2): Ylang-ylang oil ‘Extra’ is the first and most volatile fraction containing 20-40% of the total distillate. It is a stable, pale yellow, mobile liquid.

It has a floral top note, a floral, fruity, spicy body, and a light flowery, balsamic powdery dry-out lasting about 48 hours. The main chemical components are –

  • (E,E)-farnesene
  • Benzyl acetate
  • Linalool
  • Delta-cadinene
  • P-methylanisole
  • Beta-caryophyllene
  • Methyl benzoate
  • Benzyl benzoate
  • Geranyl acetate

It is used as a lifting agent in high-quality perfumes of floral, floral aldehydic, chypre and Oriental types. ‘Third’ grade ylang-ylang is a clear, yellow, somewhat oily liquid. Its odour is tenacious, sweet and floral and different from ‘Extra’ quality oil for which it is not a substitute.

Its main chemical components are: (E,E)-farnesene, beta-caryophyllene, alpha-humulene, delta-cadinene, gamma-cadinene, benzyl benzoate, linalool, geranyl acetate, (E)-nerolidol. Essential oils (paragraph 3): Several samples of ylang-ylang oil from Yunnan, southern China were found to be remarkably rich in gamma-muurolene. Cananga oil is a stable, yellow to greenish-yellow, mobile liquid.

It has a floral, woody, medicated top note, a sweet, floral, medicated body and a sweet floral dry-out lasting 24 hours. Its main chemical components are: beta-caryophyllene, alpha-humulene, (E,E)-farnesene, gamma-cadinene, delta-cadinene, benzyl benzoate, linalool, geranyl acetate.

Have a look at our reference links now –

  1. Cananga Essential Oil by Wise Geek
  2. Cananga Oil by Hear
  3. Cananga Oil by Cananga

Seeding A Cananga Tree

It’s not always very tough to grow a tree. It’s always about finding the right equipments and techniques. And when it is about growing something as grand as Cananga tree, then a lot of things need to be kept in mind.

Propagation of C. odorata is by seed or wildlings. Fresh seed germinates erratically; after 6-12 months storage the germination rate is higher. Hot water treatment of seed is used successfully in Nosy BÚ. Vegetative propagation by stem cuttings and budding have been tried with varying success.

Essential oils: The fragrant flowers of C. odorata are used for personal adornment and decoration at festivities and other celebrations. Malaysians and Indonesians are very fond of the scent, and the women like to hide a flower in their hair. Fresh flowers of C. odorata mixed with flowers of –

  • Jasminum sambac (L.) Aiton
  • Rosa spp.
  • Michelia champaca L.

And leaves of Pandanus amaryllifolius Roxb. are used in various ceremonies in Java and Bali.

The flowers are also put away with clothes, or scattered about the bed. The Thai apply an infusion of the flowers on the body after bathing. Two forms of C. odorata are grown commercially: cv. group Ylang-ylang, which produces ylang-ylang oil and cv. group Cananga yielding cananga oil. Both oils are distilled from the flowers, and are sometimes used in foods and beverages. Cananga oil mixed with coconut oil is used as a hair oil named Macassar oil (this oil differs from the seed oil from Schleichera oleosa (Lour.) Oken that is also called Macassar oil).

Ylang-ylang oil and cananga oil are used to supply the dominant odour note of many perfumes. ‘Extra’ quality ylang-ylang oil is much used in high-class perfumery; ‘Third’ grade ylang-ylang oil and cananga oil have a harsher, more tenacious odour and are mainly used in soaps and toiletries for men.

Medicine: C. odorata has several uses in traditional medicine. The dried flowers are used in Java against malaria and the fresh flowers are made into a paste for treating asthma. In Perak the leaves are rubbed on the skin against itch, and in West Java the bark is applied against scurf. The seed used to be used externally to cure intermittent fever. Timber: The timber is white to grey, non-durable and mainly used for boxes. It has potential for making small drums and matchsticks. Fibre: The bark can be beaten to make coarse ropes; this is done in Sulawesi.

Okay, now go through our reference links –

  1. Cananga Essential Oil by Wise Geek
  2. Cananga Oil by Hear
  3. Cananga Oil by Cananga

Beautiful Petals Of Cananga

Even I someone chooses and affords to ignore the overall amazingly breath-taking areas where Cananga trees are grown, yet one can never get over the sight of its beautiful flowers. The oil of Cananga is known for serving humans since times immemorial.

At sea-level, saplings of cultivated trees of C. odorata flower when 1.5-2 years old and 2 m tall; at 500 m altitude flowering may start only after 7 years. Wild trees do not flower until they are 9-12 m tall. When the buds open, the flowers are not yet fragrant and the petals are green and covered with white hairs; the petals enlarge, become glabrous and turn from green to yellow after 15-20 days and then the flowers emit their powerful and agreeable odour, discernable at a distance. Both cultivated and wild trees flower throughout the year, but with marked seasonal peaks after periods of dry weather.

In Peninsular Malaysia there is regular flowering for several weeks between February and May and often a second flowering between August and October. In Java there are 3-4 peaks in flowering; flowering is most abundant at the end of the rainy season, while flowers are richer in oil during the dry season. The oily fruits are eaten by –

  • Squirrels
  • Bats
  • Monkeys
  • Birds

By which means the seed is dispersed.

Plants may be raised in nursery beds, but should be handled with great care during transplanting to avoid damage to the long taproot. Direct sowing is common and seed is placed 5 cm deep in well-cultivated and fertilized planting pits of at least 50 cm depth.

Plantation: Plant spacing is at least 6 m x 6 m. A well managed plantation may remain productive for 50 years. Husbandry: Young plantations of C. odorata are often intercropped with food crops. Ring weeding and slashing of the inter-rows are important for optimal growth. For ylang-ylang production, trees are usually topped at about 3 m after 2-3 years. Topping promotes the growth of low, drooping branches, which are also tied down to pegs to keep the flowers within easy reach.

In traditional production of cananga oil, often in home gardens, the trunk is left to grow. A well-managed plantation may remain productive for 50 years.

Okay, now have a look at our reference links now –

  1. Cananga Essential Oil by Wise Geek
  2. Cananga Oil by Hear
  3. Cananga Oil by Cananga

Experiencing The Goodness – Cananga

Though Cananga oil has been mentioned throughout history, in the columns of most efficient essential oils .But the facts about the oil actually say light after the oil was first discovered and its various benefits noted and experienced.

C. odorata thrives in the more humid lowland tropics with an annual rainfall of (650-)1500-2000(-4000) mm and an average annual temperature of 21-27 deg. C. In Java it grows gregariously in moist evergreen forest and in teak forest. In New Guinea it grows up to 850 m altitude. When planted it is found up to 1200 m.

C. odorata is thought to originate from South-East Asia and occurs naturally throughout South-East Asia, Australia and several Pacific islands. It has been introduced into China, India, Africa and the Americas. Commercial cultivation of C. odorata for the production of ylang-ylang oil started in the –

  • Philippines
  • Indonesia

The First World War almost destroyed ylang-ylang cultivation in the Philippines, only one plantation continuing cultivation until the Second World War.

In the Philippines C. odorata is now a smallholder crop grown almost exclusively for local use. In 1770 C. odorata was brought from the Philippines to RÚunion, where commercial production of ylang-ylang oil started a century later. Production grew steadily, but declined sharply during the First World War; it never recovered and production virtually ceased during the economic depression of the 1930s.

In the beginning of the 20th Century C. odorata was introduced into the Comoro Islands, where an important industry developed. Production peaked during the 1980s, but then declined due to the development of tourism and expansion of food production.

Similarly, an ylang-ylang industry developed in the northern Madagascan island Nosy BÚ; it peaked around 1950 and then gradually declined. In Guangdong Province in southern China, production started recently and is still expanding. Indonesia, the Comoro Islands and Nosy BÚ are the main exporters of ylang-ylang oil. Java is the main producer of cananga oil; outside Java, the production of cananga oil is only important in Fiji.

Okay, now check out our reference links –

  1. Cananga Essential Oil by Wise Geek
  2. Cananga Oil by Hear
  3. Cananga Oil by Cananga

Cananga’s Massive Tree

Cananga tree is very illustrious in the business o wood and oil. Till date you must have only heard about the goods o the oil that is obtained from this tree. But the real fact is that, the tree o Cananga itself has many potential benefits.

An evergreen tree, 10-40 m tall, in cultivation often pruned to 3 m; trunk up to 75 cm in diameter, without buttresses; bark pale grey or silvery, smooth. Branches drooping, or slightly erect with dangling leafy twigs; young twigs minutely pubescent, glabrescent. Leaves –

  • Alternate
  • Distichous
  • Simple
  • Exstipulate

Petiole slender, 1-2 cm long, narrowly grooved, glabrous; blade elliptical to ovate-oblong, 13-29 cm x 4-10 cm, base often oblique, rounded cordate, margin more or less undulating, apex acutely acuminate, membranous, midrib and lateral veins mostly whitish-pubescent on both sides, secondary veins in 8-9 pairs, clearly visible on both sides, often with small, hairy, pitted glands in vein axils.

Commercial cultivation of C. odorata for the production of ylang-ylang oil started in the Philippines, later followed by the production of cananga oil in Indonesia. The First World War almost destroyed ylang-ylang cultivation in the Philippines, only one plantation continuing cultivation until the Second World War.

In the Philippines C. odorata is now a smallholder crop grown almost exclusively for local use. In 1770 C. odorata was brought from the Philippines to RÚunion, where commercial production of ylang-ylang oil started a century later. Production grew steadily, but declined sharply during the First World War; it never recovered and production virtually ceased during the economic depression of the 1930s.

In the beginning of the 20th Century C. odorata was introduced into the Comoro Islands, where an important industry developed. Production peaked during the 1980s, but then declined due to the development of tourism and expansion of food production. Similarly, an ylang-ylang industry developed in the northern Madagascan island Nosy BÚ; it peaked around 1950 and then gradually declined. In Guangdong Province in southern China, production started recently and is still expanding. Indonesia, the Comoro Islands and Nosy BÚ are the main exporters of ylang-ylang oil. Java is the main producer of cananga oil; outside Java, the production of cananga oil is only important in Fiji.

Go through the reference links now –

  1. Cananga Essential Oil by Wise Geek
  2. Cananga Oil by Hear
  3. Cananga Oil by Cananga

Therapeutic Magical Wand – Cananga Oil

Whenever the talk is of therapeutic oils, it is rather impossible to not mention about Cananga essential oil. The oil has many therapeutic properties and does does magic on coming in contact with the human skin.

Cananga commonly refers to cananga oil, an essential oil derived from the flowers of the Cananga tree, which is native to Asia. The oil is used as an herbal remedy and as aromatherapy oil and has a sweet, floral, slightly woody aroma.

In aromatherapy, this oil is ascribed several beneficial properties, including being an antidepressant, a sedative, an aphrodisiac and able to stimulate the circulatory system. As a home herbal remedy, cananga oil is used for various purposes, such as treating dandruff, insect bites and wounds. It is always used topically, meaning it is applied externally, to the skin or hair.

In aromatherapy, essential oils are thought to have beneficial therapeutic properties, both because of their scent and because of their effect on the body when they are applied to and absorbed by the skin. Cananga is commonly used to add fragrance to various aromatherapy products such as massage oils, body lotions, scented sprays, face creams and shampoos. Aromatherapists recommend this oil to –

  • Improve circulation
  • Eliminate toxins
  • Treat high blood pressure
  • Insomnia
  • To relieve anxiety and stress.

As a home herbal remedy, this oil is often used for its various calming and moisturizing properties and as a treatment for oily skin and hair, split ends and itchy scalp. It is also used to treat wounds and some skin diseases because of its supposed antiseptic and antibacterial properties.

The cananga tree produces a ‘complete’ oil, unlike ylang ylang which produces several distillates; cananga oil is considered of lesser quality than ylang ylang when used in perfumery work, as it is heavier, less delicate and less qualitative than ylang ylang. The first distillate of ylang ylang oil (often known as ylang ylang extra) is the distillate of the highest quality and is valued for its use for perfumery purposes.

It is important to identify the cananga trees by the botanical name, through the plant classification system, to ensure that the correct plant is being identified; the misuse and confusion of the common English names used for the cananga trees results in incorrect identification and use of both the plant and the essential oil of cananga and ylang ylang.

Go through our reference links now –

  1. Cananga Oil by Bumina
  2. Cananga Oil by HD
  3. Cananga by Plants

Cananga Essential Oil – Vivid Wonder

Cananga essential oil is one of the very dear oils of our fore-fathers. The oil, since times immemorial, have been doing a lot of good for the human population and that is just one reason why it is considered so useful and beneficial by many even today.

The cananga tree (Cananga odorata) is of the same botanical family (Annonaceae) as the tree which produces ylang ylang essential oil, Cananga odorata var. genuina; however, sometimes the wrong name is used to describe the different trees and the essential oils produced. Both for botany and aromatherapy purposes, it is important to know the differences and the similarities of the cananga trees.

The cananga tree (Cananga odorata) is of the same botanical family (Annonaceae) as the tree which produces ylang ylang essential oil, Cananga odorata var. genuina; however, sometimes the wrong name is used to describe the different trees and the essential oils produced. Both for botany and aromatherapy purposes, it is important to know the differences and the similarities of the cananga trees.

Traditionally, cananga has been used by local people to treat infectious diseases, such as malaria; in the Molucca islands, ylang ylang is combined with cucuma flowers to make an aromatic lotion for cosmetic and hair care use, use in skin diseases and to prevent infections and fever. In Victorian England, the oil was used in hair care and called Macassar oil.

Both species of the cananga tree produce an essential oil which is used in aromatherapy; to add to the confusion, cananga essential oil is sometimes incorrectly described as ylang ylang essential oil and the latter distillate of ylang ylang is often sold as cananga oil. However, both essential oils have different (yet similar) aromatic properties.

The essential oil of the cananga tree is used to treat insect bites, in skin care, to relieve –

  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • Stress

Apart from all that it even is antiseptic, sedative, aphrodisiac, antidepressant, a tonic and a nervine. Ylang ylang essential oil is used to treat insomnia, stress, in skin care, to treat hyperactivity in children and as an aid to sexual difficulties; it is antiseptic, aphrodisiac, calming, balancing and a sedative.

Okay, now go through our reference links now –

  1. Cananga Oil by Bumina
  2. Cananga Oil by HD
  3. Cananga by Plants

Cananga’s Family Member – Ylang Ylang Oil

Not many are aware that Cananga Oil and Ylang Ylang are actually as closely related as Clove oil and Clove’s leaf oil. These two are obtained from the same tree and hence often people confuse the two for each other.

Ylang-ylang is very much useful for health. The ylang-ylang oil has a sedative and euphoric effect which is directly sensed at the nervous system and this helps with tension, anxiety, fear, shock and even panic. It helps in reducing mental stress and makes one feel free from tension and depression. One who is shocked with any incident or have fear of anything for them it is very effective as it helps in removing it. It has remarkable properties in reducing high blood pressure and also helpful for treating intestinal infections.

One who has problem of high blood pressure, for them this oil is quite affective and regular use of this oil helps them to keep their pressure in control. It is referred for rapid breathing and heart beats. It plays a major role in balancing the sebum secretion of our body.

It prevents the dryness of the skin and even deals with over oily skin. It is very much useful for those who have pimples on their faces. It also acts as a hair tonic which helps in the hair growth. To top on that it helps in controlling down hair fall.

Ylang-ylang oil is used in vapour therapy as it could help in easing –

  • Anxiety
  • Shock
  • Rapid breathing
  • Fear
  • Panic
  • Impotence
  • Insomnia
  • Stress
  • Depression

It blends well with many oils such as bergamot, sandalwood, grapefruit and lavender. They are preferred to be used as massage oils or used in baths to relieve help along with frigidity, depression, anxiety, stress and many more.

Due to extreme scent, it has calming properties and also used in case of impotence and frigidity. It stimulates the hair growth largely, stops early hair loss and also controls the sebum production and stimulates its effect. Ylang-ylang oil is extracted from the flowers which are freshly picked and the process is completed by steam distillation. The primary distillation technique is known as Ylang-ylang extra which is the top grade extraction. With the process of solvent extraction, an absolute as well as concrete is produced.

Okay, have a look at our reference links now –

  1. Cananga Oil by Bumina
  2. Cananga Oil by HD
  3. Cananga by Plants

The Countless Properties Of Cananga Oil

Most of the original essential oils have properties with which not many medicines or artificial products can compete. One of such oils is Cananga essential oil. The oil has indeed got countless properties that are no less magical than what science does today.

Cananga odorata var. genuina. It belongs to the Anonaceae family and is known as “flower of flowers”. The tree is the native of Philippines and even in other parts of the Far East. Ylang-ylang oil is extracted from the small beautiful flower by the process of steam distillation.

It has a very exotic and floral fragrance that is liked by almost all people. Smell of it is very pleasant. Ylang-ylang oil is slight yellowish in colour. Due to this reason they are largely present in perfumery industry. They have relaxing properties with its pleasant odour and its sedative effect.

It has to be noted that excessive use of ylang-ylang oil leads to headaches, nausea and vomiting. It is not suitable for those who are allergenic to any smell. There are therapeutic uses for ylang-ylang oil which are –

  • Antiseptic
  • Antidepressant
  • Hypotensive
  • Sedative
  • Aphrodisiac
  • Anti-seborrhoeic

Ylang-ylang consists of geranyl acetate, p-cresyl methyl ether, benzyl acetate, linalool, caryophyllene, methyl benzoate and benzyl benzoate. To prepare the oil, it has to be passed from various stages. Moreover, the extraction of the oil deals with a lot of procedures which are known as pressings.

It is divided in to 3 pressings and the first one is known as ‘extra’ in first pressing it takes more time as it yields high amounts of esters and due to this they have a sweet odour and it is very pleasant whereas in the later pressings it has less-sweet odour. Extra is not used in aromatherapy but it is preferred in the perfumery industry. In aromatherapy, the pressings are combined to form the ylang-ylang essential oil.

Along with benefits there are some disadvantages so before using it one should keep in mind that the oil is regarded as non-irritant, non-toxic and even non-sensitizing oil, but there are irritations reported in very few cases too. It is recommended to test it on small part of body and keep for some time. If irritation occurs then it is not suitable for that skin.

Alright, have a look at our reference links now –

  1. Cananga Oil by Bumina
  2. Cananga Oil by HD
  3. Cananga by Plants